Professional testimonials

Testimonials from health

The first fun method I've learned and used since medical school! The NeurOptimal® training helps the practitioner and the client to "get out of the Matrix" (reference to the Matrix movie). An incredibly fast, enjoyable and highly effective way to reach a state of optimal form and function. The technique is indescribable in words, it has to be lived. »
Dr. Curt Pinchuck
Clifton, NJ
This method of brain regulation is capable of bringing so many benefits to so many people that it is urgent to make it known.
Dr. Jean-Pierre Ledru
Psychiatrist
I have been a psychotherapist for 40 years, and I have never before seen people benefit from a therapeutic experience the way they have with NeurOptimal®. It is a source of humility for me, while at the same time being a very rewarding experience.
Dr. Brian J. Kelly
NeurOptimal® Trainer, Bridgeport, CT
NeurOptimal® has been a great support in my work at the Psychology Clinic (Clinical Psychologist). I have used Biofeedback for many years in my work, but adding NeurOptimal® to it has been a joy. Not only have the training results been excellent, but the number of positive side effects has also increased significantly. These positive side effects reported to me include a lucidity and learning ability that clients and their families say they have contributed to an overall sense of well-being, presence and effectiveness in their lives.
Dr Allen Darbonne​
Ph.D., Malibu, CA
The use of NeurOptimal® has been a "life-changing" process for me and the vast majority of my patients, friends and family members, in a way that has been subtle, smooth, and even difficult to define in some areas, while being quite direct and quite obvious in others. My opinion as a scientist and clinician is that this is the most powerful, sophisticated, advanced, and non-linear technology available to transform itself at this time.
Edward O’Malley​
Ph.D., Director, Sleep Healthcare of Connecticut​
I had been called in to intervene with a family... The girl was nine years old, and had a rather severe case of autism: no language, terrible outbursts of anger, to the point of beating her mother and leaving her bruised. The child was sent to me, and we did intense sessions for a month, usually twice a day. By the time we were finished, she was able to speak five-word sentences, was no longer throwing tantrums, was clean, and could watch and change her own videos herself. This was a huge change for this family! This child's behaviour had improved dramatically; she was sleeping through the night and feeling happy during the day. Her cognitive abilities changed drastically at home and at school.
Dr. Lise’ DeLong​
Cognitive Connections, Greenwood, IN​
In my experience with neurofeedback and attention deficit disorder, many children are able to improve their reading ability and decrease their need for medication*. Neurofeedback also helps to reduce impulsivity and aggression. It is an effective tool in part because the patient participates in the treatment by taking more control of his or her own physiological processes.
Daniel Amen​
Clinical Neuroscientist, Child and Adolescent Psychologist
For chronic illnesses such as epilepsy, depression, hyperactivity, eating disorders, brain injuries and other ailments, i.e. the kind of illnesses against which conventional medicine is not very good, neurofeedback is in many ways more useful than medication, with far fewer side effects.
Jamie Deckoff-Jones
Doctor
Neurofeedback is one of those very accessible tools, and it's a good tool. Like all tools, it doesn't work for everyone, but it is beneficial to most people. It accelerates the disappearance of symptoms and the development of healthy self-regulation, that is to say, it helps the patient's body to self-adjust.
Thomas Brod
Psychiatrist
Following a year-long study of 100 children with attention deficit disorder (ADD) :All those who received neurofeedback were able to reduce their dosage by at least half* while maintaining the benefits of their treatment. And about 40% were able to stop taking their medication*.
Vincent J. Monastra
Doctor, Clinic Director
In 38 years of practice, I have never seen any treatment that has been able to produce the results that neurofeedback has achieved. I have seen results achieved in days or weeks that previously took months or years using the best techniques available. »
Jack Woodward
Psychiatrist
Neurofeedback improves epilepsy, depression, lack of self-confidence or congenital head injuries and the 'insanity' that often accompanies them. Patients report that they sleep better and feel better, they no longer have seizures, they control themselves better and they perform better. It is effective for head injuries. It's effective for chronic neurological diseases without injury but with brain dysfunction. We have had good results with multiple sclerosis, toxic encephalopathy (a chemical poisoning that degrades neurological functioning for example), with chronic pain, migraines and fibromyalgia.
Jonathan Walker
Neurologist
My usual experience is that regardless of the psychoactive treatment, the client can be expected to be able to reduce the dosage by at least 50%* and still get a better effect and more well-being. If neurofeedback is practiced long enough and at least twice a week, clients often no longer need their treatment*.
Steve Ebright
Neuropsychologist
Overall, the results [of research for the treatment of children with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder - ADHD] support the use of multimodal treatments including medication, parent/school counselling, and neurofeedback for the long-term control of ADHD. Neurofeedback in particular provides a lasting effect even in the absence of stimulating drug treatment. Parents interested in treatment that is neither drug nor psychological can continue to use complementary and alternative therapies. The most promising therapy according to recent clinical trials is neurofeedback.
Katie Campbell Daley
Ph.D. from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
Neurofeedback meets the criteria of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as a clinical recommendation for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, anxiety (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - OCD, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, phobias), depression, reading difficulties, and alcohol or drug dependence. This suggests that neurofeedback should always be considered by clinicians as an intervention method for these disorders.
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
The editors of the journal
In recent years, many medical professionals have written books reporting the benefits of biofeedback in the face of various disorders. In addition, many psychiatrists and neurologists have integrated neurofeedback into their practice. Despite this, doctors and health professionals rarely encourage people to continue neurofeedback sessions. Their skepticism stems from their lack of information, experience and expertise in neurofeedback, rather than a problem with its effectiveness.
Barry Belt
Psychologist
Since virtually everyone has the ability to learn, most people benefit from neurofeedback to the extent that they can. Most studies show that 70-80% of patients make great strides. In these studies, everyone is treated equally. Because everyone's brain difficulties are different, we have an advantage in clinical situations because we can tailor the treatment to the individual's needs. This usually ensures a better success rate.
Lilian Marcus
Doctor
Overall, the results [of research for the treatment of children with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder - ADHD] support the use of multimodal treatments including medication, parent/school counselling, and neurofeedback for the long-term control of ADHD. Neurofeedback in particular provides a lasting effect even in the absence of stimulating drug treatment. Parents interested in treatment that is neither drug nor psychological can continue to use complementary and alternative therapies. The most promising therapy according to recent clinical trials is neurofeedback.
Katie Campbell Daley
Ph.D. from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
We have conducted landmark studies that ultimately show that neurofeedback works in a significant way. Neurofeedback is still regarded as an alternative medicine, but some people totally reject conventional medicine. A great many people are really looking forward to using this method.
Eran Zaidel
Professor of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience at the Brain Research Institute of the University of Los Angeles